Visitations

This week we had visitors on, and around the boat. They came in a range of shapes and sizes. First of all there was part of my family. Boat life can start to seem normal surprisingly quickly. It becomes ‘just’ life. I’ve heard it said that people often only go to their local sites – museums and so forth – when people come to visit. This week was a bit like that. I had forgotten just how pleasant it is to sit in the cockpit, even in harbour, and enjoy being aboard. So that’s what we did. We sat and nattered and ate nibbles and drank wine. Very pleasant. In these situations conversations often seem to turn to the future, and The Grand Voyage (where we sail Teka around the world) came up. It looks like we have some crew for the Iceland-to-Newfoundland leg!

The second visitor turned up whilst we were in the cockpit. Portishead marina is, as I have mentioned before, pretty good for wildlife of the winged variety. There are, of course, the gulls. They are big and bossy and loud. Interestingly they have learned how to open mussels which grow on the pontoon legs by flying them above the harbour sides and dropping them so they crack. Like a nautical lamergeier. I’ve seen a few people narrowly missed, and I am sure that it’s only a matter of time before I get hit by a plummeting mollusc. There is a pair of buzzards who fly over occasionally, only to get mobbed by the gulls. There was a grey heron which slept by the pontoon entrance, but I haven’t seen it for a while now. It may have finally got fed up with me accidentally waking it up every time I came home from work around midnight. Then there is our favourite, Colin. Colin the cormorant. We were sat in the cockpit admiring Colin, who was drying his wings on the next pontoon over, when he was joined by a second cormorant. We immediately named this one Connie. Not being experts, we are basing their sex on absolutely nothing more than a vague hope for the appearance of smaller cormorants.

Later in the week we exchanged my family for Keith’s. We were visited by his father, step-mother, brother, and dog. Their visit was rather more practical than the earlier one had been. While I was at work almost the entire down rail was sanded and rubbed with teak oil, and two bits of damaged caulking were fixed – one in the companionway hatch, and the other in the deck. The latter had been causing us no end of problems, not least that it had allowed rain in to the galley. It should, hopefully, now be water tight once again.

It was particularly interesting having a dog on board. We are very keen on getting a boat dog, although there are a few practical considerations which are preventing us. Not least the knowledge that boats arriving at the Galapagos are fumigated to prevent foreign spiders and so forth. It’s unlikely that a dog would be allowed on to such a fragile ecosystem. Fergus the Jack Russell hadn’t been on a boat before. Initially he was very nervous indeed. All vibrate-y. However, once he had checked everything out he was very happy, and seemed to pretty much decide that this boat was now his.

fullsizeoutput_9c0This week’s oddities of boat life:

3. Mentally categorising leaks in terms of vertical (i.e. lets rain in): not the end of the world, and horizontal (i.e. lets sea in): panic!

n.b. Horizontal leaks are, thankfully, hypothetical entities.

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